FANFOOD RULES: #5. Pickle This!

Pickle-This!_AD[2]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You have tried your hand at BBQ, smoked everything from ingredients for drinks to the ice cubes that chill them, now it is time to join the newest trend, pickling and fermenting.

They go hand in hand with BBQ, from the brine, to the marinades and sauces and dressings you use to flavor your food. It’s all cohesive. After all, doesn’t a great pickle go perfectly with great BBQ? This is what this article is all about.

Here you will find information about pickling, the art of fermentation, brining, and curing food, and a whopping 180 recipes for you to choose from.

 

 

 - INDEX -

 

Pickling 101
Pickling Methods
FANFOOD Pickle Recipes
The Art of Fermentation
How to Make Sauerkraut
Kimchi
Pickling vs. Brining vs. Curing
Wet Brine Ratio
Dry Brining
Curing
Sauce and Dressings
Homemade Sriracha
FANFOOD Sauces
Dressing 101
Homemade Mayo in 2 minutes or less
FANFOOD Dressings
Tips and Links

 

 

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Pickling 101

 

Pickling is a process of preserving food in a high acid brine. The brine lowers the pH of foods to 4.6 or lower, creating an adverse environment for microorganisms, thus preventing spoilage. The brine doubles as a flavor-enhancer. There are two types of pickles; Quick-pickled foods stored in the refrigerator increase shelf life, keep a crisp texture and are fast and easy to make. Water-bath canned-pickled foods can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 year.

This is the perfect time of year to think about pickling and canning. You may have a nice vegetable garden that is overflowing and you don’t have enough friends to share your treasure with, or you are tired of eating cucumbers and tomatoes. Either way, here are some great ways for you to enjoy the fruits of your labor, year round.

 

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Pickling methods

 

Refrigerator Pickles. This method is simple. You simply pack the pickles in a bottle with a brine and store them in the fridge for a few days and eat. Some are ready in 24 hours. They keep for 2 months or so in the fridge. Click here for my recipe for Quick & Easy Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles. Here’s my recipe for Sweet & Sour Pickle Chips for Sandwiches.

Quick Process or Fresh Pack or Heat Processed or Canned Pickles. In order to store pickles at room temp, pickles must be pasteurized. The jars are sterilized before filling, the pickles are usually packed with a salt brine, vinegar, and spice mix, they are packed in special bottles with special lids, and then they are submerged in boiling water for a precise time. The contents are not only pickled but cooked, which changes their flavor and texture. This is how grandma stored veggies in the basement for the winter.

Fermented Pickles. Fresh sauerkraut and the pickles you buy from a pickle barrel are fermented in barrels or vats. The process allows bacteria to turn sugars to lactic acid. It takes time and careful control over the temperature and humidity and the bacteria that do the fermentation. It can be done at home, but it’s tricky.

New Pickles or Overnight Pickles. They are by far the easiest. When you are done with a jar of pickles, the brine has been diluted a bit, but it is still good. Throw some fresh pickling cucumbers or green tomatoes in the brine for at least one day. They will soak up the brine, remain bright green and crunchy, and taste just like store-bought for up to two weeks. You can’t keep them for long because the brine isn’t full strength, nor do you want to. It is the fresh new flavor that makes them charming. Just don’t try to use a brine twice.

Pickling Spices are a blend of spices, differing from packer to packer, and can include allspice, bay leaves, black peppercorns, cardamom, cinnamon bark, cloves, coriander seeds, dill seeds, ginger, hot pepper flakes, juniper berries, mace, and mustard seeds.

Genuine Dills are made by fermentation with dill weed or dill oil added during the fermentation

Kosher Dills have garlic added. They may not, in fact, be made according to kosher laws, but they are said to be kosher style.

German-Style Dill Pickles are cucumber pickles that not fermented, don’t use a salt brine, but are cured in vinegar or lemon juice.

Sweet or Sweet-Sour Pickles have both sugar and vinegar in the packing.

Gherkins are a special small variety of cucumber, and they can be made either sweet or sour, they are usually sweet in the US.

Sweet/Hot Pickles are sweet and amped up with hot peppers.

Bread & Butter Pickles or Pickle Chips are usually sweet/sour pickled cukes sliced crosswise into coins for sandwiches.

Half Sours are refrigerator pickles made without vinegar and have been aged for about two weeks. They are usually brighter green and very crunchy.

Three quarter sours are the same as half sours, but they have just been stored longer, usually about a month.

Sour Pickles are the same as half sours, but they have just been stored about three months.

 

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FANFOOD Pickles

 

There is an old Pennsylvania Dutch custom requiring, “7 sweets and 7 sours”. It is typical of their belief that things are to be balanced and proper. All sorts of pickles qualify for the 7-7 Rule.

Here are the Recipes…

 

Best Ever Dill Pickles

Note: if pickling cucumbers are not available use regular garden cucumbers. DO NOT USE Waxed Cucumbers sold in supermarkets.

 

INGREDIENTS
3 to 3 ½ pounds of 4-inch pickling cucumbers
4 cups water
4 cups white vinegar
½ cup sugar
1/3 cup pickling salt
6 tablespoons dill seeds

 

PREPARATION

Thoroughly scrub cucumbers with a soft vegetable brush in plenty of cold running water. Remove stems and blossom ends. Cut cucumbers lengthwise into quarters.

In a 4 to 5 quart stainless steel enamel or nonstick heavy pot, combine the water the vinegar, sugar, and pickling salt. Bring mixture to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar.

Pack cucumber spears loosely into six hot sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a ½-inch headspace. Add 1Tbs dill seeds to each jar. Pour hot vinegar mixture into jars, maintaining the ½-inch headspace. Discard remaining mixture.

Wipe jars clean; adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes (start timing when water returns to boiling). Remove jars from canner; cool on wire racks.

Let stand at room temperature for 1 week before serving.

 

HOT GARLIC PICKLES
Prepare as directed, except substitute cider vinegar for the white. Before packing cukes, add 1 to 2 fresh Thai chile peppers and 2 cloves of garlic, halved to each jar.
SWEET DILL PICKLES
Prepare as directed except increase sugar to 3 cups.
REFRIGERATOR PICKLES
Prepare as directed through step 3, except add 1 or 2 springs fresh dill to each jar. Store pickles in the fridge for up to 1 month.

 

Pickled Carrots and Radishes

 

INGREDIENTS

6 medium carrots, peeled and bias-cut into ¼ inch thick slices
1 to 2 medium fresh Anehiem chile peppers, seeded and thinly sliced
6 large radishes, stemmed and quarted
1 large fresh jalapeno, seeded and sliced thin
½ cup white vinegar
½ cup water
1 bay leaf
1 ½ tsp salt
1 ½ tsp honey
½ tsp dried oregano, crushed
½ tsp coriander seeds
½ tsp coarsely ground black pepper
¼ tsp dried marjoram, crushed
¼ tsp dried thyme, crushed

 

PREPARATION

In a large nonmetal bowl or glass, combine carrots, peppers, and radishes.

In a small saucepan, combine everything else, bring to boil, reducing heat to simmer and simmer uncovered for 5 minutes.

Pour hot vinegar mixture over vegetable to combine, cool, cover and chill overnight before serving. Stir occasionally.

Store in fridge for up to 3 days.

 

 

Bread and Butter Pickles

 

INGREDIENTS

16 cups, sliced small to medium pickling cukes
8 medium white onions, sliced
1/3 cup pickling Salt
3 cloves garlic, halved
Crushed ice
3 cups cider vinegar
2 Tbs mustard seeds
1 ½ tsp ground turmeric
1 ½ tsp celery seeds

PREPARATION

In a 6 to 8 quart stainless steel enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine cucumbers, onions, pickling salt, and garlic.

Top mixture with 2 inches of crushed ice. Cover with lid and chill in the fridge for 3 to 12 hours.

Remove any remaining ice from pot. Transfer cukes to large colander, set in sink; drain. Discard Garlic.

In the same pot, combine sugar, vinegar, mustard seeds, turmeric, and celery seeds. Bring to boiling, stirring to dissolve sugar.

Add cuke mixture, return to boiling, remove from heat.

Pack hot mixture and liquid into hot sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace. Wipe jar rims; adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling water canner for 10 minutes. (start timing when water returns to boiling).

Remove and cool on wire racks.

 

 

Jamaican Jerk Pickle Chips

 

INGREDIENTS

3 ½ pounds 4 to 5 inch pickling cucumbers
1 – (3 to 4) inch stick cinnamom
1 tsp whole allspice
2 cups water
2 cups white vinegar
2 cups rice or cider vinegar
1 cup honey
½ cup lime juice
¼ cup pickling salt
7 sprigs fresh thyme
7 – (3 to 4) inch cinnamon
7 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 tsp whole allspice
1 tsp whole black peppercorns
4 fresh habanero peppers or jalapeno, seeded and thinly sliced

 

PREPARATION

Thoroughly scrub cukes with a soft vegetable brush, in plenty of cold running water. Remove stems and blossoms, slicing off blossom ends. Cut into ¼ inch to ½ inch slices.

Make a spice bag by placing 1 stick cinnamon, and 1 tsp allspice in the center of a double thick 6 inch square of 100-percent cotton cheesecloth. Bring up the corners, tie closed with clean 100 percent cotton kitchen string.

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine water, vinegars, honey, lime juice, salt, and spice bag. Bring to boil over medium high heat, stirring gently to dissolve honey. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

Pack cuke slices loosely in 7 hot sterilized pint canning jars. Leaving ½ inch headspace.

Divide thyme springs, the cinnamon, garlic, peppercorns, 1 tsp allspice, and peppers among the jars.

Remove spice bag from hot vinegar mixture and discard. Pour hot vinegar mixture over cucumbers. Maintaining the head space of ½ inch.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

Let stand at room temp for 1 week before serving.

 

 

Thyme Infused Pickled Cherries

 

INGREDIENTS

8 cups fresh dark sweet cherries, stemmed and pitted.
2 fresh thyme sprigs
2 bay leaves
2 cups water
1 cup red wine vinegar
½ cup packed brown sugar
1 tsp Salt
6 whole black peppercorns
4 whole cloves

 

PREPARATION

Pack cherries, thyme sprigs, and bay leaves in two 1 quart canning jars

In a medium saucepan combine the brown sugar, salt, peppercorns, and cloves. Bring to a boil stirring to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for 15 minutes; cool.

Pour hot vinegar mixture over cherries in jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Discard any remaining vinegar mixture.

Chill for 1 week before serving.

Store in the refrigerator for up to a month.

 

 

Pickled Pineapple with Candied Ginger

Note: for 12 cups of fresh pineapple slices you will need 2 to 3 whole pineapples, peeled and cored.

 

INGREDIENTS

3 cups cider vinegar
2 cups sugar
2 cups unsweetened pineapple juice
7 (3 to 4) inch cinnamon sticks
7 star anise (optional)
12 cups fresh pineapple pieces (about 1 inch)
¼ cup finely chopped crystallized ginger.

PREPARATION

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine vinegar sugar and juice. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

Add 1 cinnamon stick and anise to each seven hot sterilized pint canning jars. Fill jars with pineapple and ginger. Pour the hot mixture in each, maintaining the ½ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

Let stand for 2 days before serving.

 

 

Sweet and Sour Pickled Sweet Peppers

 

INGREDIENTS

3 pounds red, green, yellow, orange sweet peppers
2 large onions. Halved and thinly sliced
4 cups sugar
4 cups water
3 cups white vinegar
2 cups cider vinegar
1 Tbs celery seeds
1 Tbs whole black peppercorns
1 tsp mustard seed
4 cloves garlic, smashed
4 bay leaves
2 tsp salt

 

PREPARATION

Remove stems and seeds from peppers. Cut lengthwise into bite size strips. I a large bowl combine strips and sliced onions; set aside.

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine sugar, water, vinegars, celery seeds, peppercorns, mustard seed, garlic, bay leaves, and salt. Bring to boiling, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Reduce to simmer, covers for 15 minutes. Discard garlic and bay leaves.

Pack pepper-onion mixture, leaving a ½ inch headspace. Pour hot vinegar mixture into jars, maintaining the ½ inch headspace. Discard any leftover mix

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

 

 

Mexican Pickled Pintos, Corn and Poblano Peppers

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ pounds fresh poblano peppers (about 6)
4 cups fresh corn kernels (about 8 ears)
3 – (15 to 16) oz cans pinto beans, rinsed and drained
3 cups white vinegar
1 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 Tbs cumin seeds
3 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
2 Tbs pickling salt

 

PREPARATION

Roast Peppers. Preheat oven to 425F, cut peppers in half lengthwise; remove stems seeds and membranes. Place pepper halves, cut side down, on a foil lined baking sheet. Roast for 30 to 35 minutes or until skins are blistered and dark.

You can also broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 8 to 10 minutes.

Bring the foil up around the peppers and fold edges to enclose. Let stand for 15 minutes or until cool enough to handle.

Using a sharp knife, lossen edges of skins; gently pull off skins in strips and discard. Cut peppers in ½ inch pieces.

In in medium saucepan, cook corn in a small amount of boiling water, covered for 5 minutes, drain and cool. Remove kernels.

In a large bowl, combine corn peppers, and beans; set aside.

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine vinegar, sugar, water, cumin seeds, garlic, and salt. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Stirring to dissolve sugar.

Pack bean mixture into 5 hot sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace. Pout hot vinegar mixture, distributing spices evenly among jars while maintaining the ½ in headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

Let stand 3 weeks before serving.

Top with fresh cilantro when you serve.

 

 

Mustardy Pickled Banana Peppers

 

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds fresh sweet and/or hot banana peppers
5 cups white vinegar
2 cups water
½ cup sugar
1 Tbs dry mustard
4 cloves garlic, smashed
½ tsp ground turmeric
4 Tbs yellow mustard seeds
4 Tbs brown mustard seeds

 

PREPARATION

Slice chile peppers into rings, discarding stem ends and excess seeds

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine vinegar, water, sugar, dry mustard, garlic and turmeric. Bring to boil, stirring to do what? Dissolve sugar. Reduce heat; simmer uncovered for 5 minutes. Discard garlic.

Pack peppers into 4 hot sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace. Add 1 Tbs yellow mustard seeds and 1 Tbs brown mustard seeds to each jar.

Ladle hot vinegar mixture into jars, maintaining the ever important ½ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

Let stand at room temperature for 1 week before serving.

 

 

Zucchini & Sweet Pepper Refrigerator Pickles

 

INGREDIENTS

6 cups thinly sliced zucchini
3 cups thinly sliced red and/or green sweet peppers (or any color you like)
1 cup thinly sliced red onion (1 large)
Cold water
3 cups sugar
3 cups cider vinegar
3 cups water

 

PREPARATION

In an extra-large nonmetallic bowl, combine zucchini, sweet peppers, and onion. Sprinkle vegetables with kosher salt; toss gently to coat. Add enough cold water to cover veggies. Cover and let stand at room temp for 3 hours.

Transfer veggies to colander set in sink, Rinse with cold water; drain and set aside.

In a large stainless steel, enamel or non stick heavy pot, combine vinegar, sugar and 3 cups of water. Bring to boil; stirring to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat.

Pack veggies into sterilized pint canning jars, pour hot vinegar mixture over veggies making sure to cover them all.

Cool for 30 minutes.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Chill for 1 to 2 days before serving.

Store in fridge for up to a month.

 

 

Spicy – Sweet Pickled Three Bean Salad

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ pounds fresh green beans, trimmed and cut into 1 ½ inch pieces.
Ice water
2 – (15 to 16) oz cans dark kidney beans, rinsed and drained
2 ½ cups chopped red sweet peppers (2 large)
2 fresh jalapeno peppers, finely chopped
4 ½ cups sugar
3 cups white vinegar
2 ¼ cups water
¾ cup cider vinegar
¾ cup red wine vinegar
1 ½ Tbs pickling Salt

 

PREPARATION

Fill large pot about 2/3 full with water. Bring to boiling. Add green beans; blanch for 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to large bowl of ice water. Repeat to blanch wax beans. Drain in large colander in sink. In a large bowl, combine both beans, kidney beans, sweet peppers, onions, and jalapenos.
Meanwhile in a 4 quart stainless steel enamel or nonstick heavy pot, combine sugar, white vinegar, and pickling salt. Bring to boil, stirring as always to dissolve, sugar and salt.

Pack bean mixture into hot sterilized pint canning jars, leaving the ever needed ½ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 15 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

Let stand at room temperature for 1 week before serving.

 

 

Pickled Golden Beets with Lemons and Fennel Seed

 

INGREDIENTS

3 pounds small to medium golden beets (2 to 3 inch diameter)
3 cups white vinegar
1 cup water
½ cup sugar
1 Tbs finely shredded lemon peel
10 whole pink peppercorns

 

PREPARATION

Wash beets. Cut off beet tops, leaving 1-inch stems; trim root ends. Place beets in a 4 to 6 quart pot; add enough water to cover. Bring to a boil then reduce heat. Simmer uncovered about 25 minutes or until tender. Drain

Cool beets slightly; trim off roots and stems. Carefully slip off and discard skins; quarter beets.

In the same pot, combine vinegar, water, sugar, fennel seeds, lemon peel, and peppercorns. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered for 5 minutes.

Pack quartered beets in hot sterilized half-pint canning jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace. Carefully pour boiling vinegar mixture with spices over beets, while maintaining the ½ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rims, adjust lids and screw bands.

Process filled jars in boiling-water canner for 15 minutes (starting the time as the water comes to boiling) Remove, cool on wire racks.

 

 

Pickled Beets with Orange and Cinnamon

Prepare as directed, except use red beets. Omit fennel seeds and substitute finely shredded orange peel for the lemon peel.
Make a spice bag with the pink peppercorns, 3 inch stick of cinnamon, and 8 whole cloves in the center of a double thick 6 inch square of 100 percent cotton cheesecloth. Bring up the corners; tie closed with clean 100 percent cotton kitchen string. Add spice bag along with the vinegar; remove and discard before pouring vinegar over beets.

 

 

Pickled Eggs #1

Hard-boil and peel the eggs (8). Put them in a jar with some of your red beets, juice in all. Refrigerate and let them sit for at least 2 days.


Pickled Eggs #2

 

INGREDIENTS

1 15oz can sliced beets, undrained
1 cup cider vinegar
½ cup water
½ cup sugar
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 tsp mustard seed
1 tsp pickling salt
¼ tsp crushed red pepper
8 hard boiled eggs, peeled
1 spring fresh dill

 

PREPARATION

For brine, strain the beet liquid into a medium nonreactive saucepan, reserving sliced beets. Add everything but the eggs and dill.

Bring to boil, reduce heat. Simmer uncovered for 6 minutes, stirring to dissolve sugar.

Stir in beets; cook for 2 more minutes. Remove from heat.

Cool about 2 hours or until room temperature.

Place eggs and dill in a clean glass jar with tight fitting lid. If desired, add beets from brine.

Strain brine over eggs in the jar, covering them completely. Add more water and vinegar if needed.

Screw on tightly. Chill in the fridge for 24 hours or up to a week, swirling occasionally.

 

Garam Masala Eggs
Prepare as directed, except omit mustard seeds and dill. Add 2 tsp garam masala and 2 or 3 star anise to the brine.

 

Jalapeno Pickled Eggs
Prepare as directed, except omit beets, cider vinegar and dill. Add 1 ½ cups white vinegar, an additional ½ cup water, 2 tsp cumin seeds, and 1 seeded and chopped fresh jalapeno pepper to brine.
Add 1 small onion, cut into thin wedges after cooking the brine in the jars along with a sprig of fresh cilantro.

 

 

Pickled Garlic

 

INGREDIENTS

½ cup garlic cloves (32 – 40 cloves), peeled
¾ cup white or red wine vinegar
1 sprig fresh thyme
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1 bay leaf
10 whole black peppercorns
2 tsp sugar
½ tsp pickling salt
¼ tsp mustard seeds

 

PREPARATION

In a small saucepan combine garlic, vinegar, thyme, rosemary, bay leaf, peppercorns, sugar, pickling salt, and mustard seeds. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 3 minutes.

Ladle hot garlic mixture into a hot clean half-pint canning jar leaving ¼ inch headspace.

Wipe jar rim, cover loosely. Cool for 30 minutes. Cover tightly.

Chill for 24 hours before serving.

Store in fridge for up to a month.

 

 

Grilled Bread and Butter Pickles

 

INGREDIENTS

2 ½ pounds (4-5 inch) pickling cucumbers
1 medium onion, cut into ½ inch slices
2 cloves garlic, sliced
¾ cup cider vinegar
¾ cup water
½ cup sugar
2 Tbs pickling salt
1 ½ tsp mustard seeds
½ tsp celery seed
½ tsp ground turmeric
½ tsp crushed red pepper

 

PREPARATION

Thoroughly scrub cucumbers. Remove stems and blossoms, slice off blossoms ends. Cut cucumbers lengthwise into quarters

Place cucumbers and onion slices on the rack of a covered grill directly over medium heat. Grill about 6 minutes or until grill marks appear, turning once halfway through grilling. Cool slightly; separate onion slices into rings. Pack cucumbers onion rings and garlic into three sterilized pint jars.

In a medium stainless-steel, enamel, or nonstick heavy saucepan, combine vinegar, water, sugar, pickling salt, mustard seeds, celery seeds, turmeric, and crushed red pepper. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Remove from heat.

Pour hot vinegar mixture over cucumbers and onion, making sure to cover vegetables. Cool for 30 minutes.

Seal and label jars, chill for 1 to 2 days before serving.

Store in the fridge for up to 30 days.

 

 

Israeli Pickles

 

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 cups cold water
1 1/2 cups distilled white vinegar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/4 teaspoon dill seeds
6 to 8 Kirby cucumbers, sliced into thin rounds

 

PREPARATION

Combine the water, vinegar, sugar, and salt in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature.

Mix the onion, garlic, mustard seeds, turmeric, dill seeds, and cucumbers together in a large bowl. When the vinegar mixture has cooled, pour it over the cucumbers and stir well to combine.

Transfer the pickles to a 1-quart glass jar, cover, and stash in the back of the fridge for at least 1 week. The pickles will keep, refrigerated, for up to several weeks.

 

 

Cauliflower Fridge Pickles

 

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 cups cold water
1 cup distilled white vinegar
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons chaat masala or amba spice mix (see below)
1 tablespoon kosher salt
Pinch ground turmeric
1 large head cauliflower
1 1/2 teaspoons nigella seeds
1 garlic clove

 

PREPARATION

Stir together the water, vinegar, sugar, chaat masala or amba, salt, and turmeric in a small pan. Bring to a boil and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature.

Meanwhile, trim the cauliflower into small florets and place in a 4-pint glass jar. Pour the cooled vinegar mixture into the jar, then toss in the nigella seeds and garlic. Cover and stash in the back of the fridge for at least 1 week. The pickles will keep, refrigerated, for up to several weeks.

 

 

Pickled Beets & Red Onions

 

INGREDIENTS

4 small red onions, thinly sliced
1 small red beet, sliced into paper-thin rounds
1 bay leaf
1 star anise
1 cinnamon stick
2 cups distilled white vinegar
1 cup granulated sugar

Place the onions, beet slices, bay leaf, star anise, and cinnamon stick in a 1-quart glass jar. Whisk together the vinegar and sugar in a small bowl and pour over the jumble of red onions and other ingredients. Cover and stash in the back of the fridge for at least 1 week. The pickles will keep, refrigerated, for up to several weeks.

 

Amba Spice Mix
Amba spice mix is commonly found at Indian and Middle Eastern spice emporiums or grocery stores. It contains dried mango powder and turmeric, among other ingredients.

 

Chaat Masala
“chaat” means “to lick,” and that this finger-licking spice blend is quite addictive.
Grind 1 tablespoon dried mango powder (amchoor or amchur), 2 teaspoons toasted cumin seeds, 2 teaspoons black salt, 1 teaspoon coarse salt, 1 teaspoon dried pomegranate seeds (anardhana), and 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns.

 

 

Pickled Spring Onions and Green Garlic

 

INGREDIENTS

6 spring onions + 4 green garlics, washed well & sliced thinly (white & light green parts only)
(totaling about 5 cups)
1 cup red wine (example: Montepulciano)
1 cup water
1 tsp. salt
3/4 cup good balsamic vinegar

 

PREPARATION

Put the onions and green garlic in a 4 quart saucepan with the red wine, water and salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then lower to a simmer for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften slightly. Add the balsamic vinegar and return to a simmer for another 5 minutes.
In the meantime, prepare 2 pint jars and their lids for boiling water canning and get your canning pot up to a boil.

Divide the hot, cooked vegetables between the two prepared jars and fill with the hot balsamic/wine liquid, leaving 1/2 inch head space. You might have some liquid left over.

Clean the rims of the jars with a wet cloth or paper towel, put lids on the jars, finger-tighten the lid rings and process in boiling water for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow to sit in the hot water for another 5 minutes before removing the jars to cool.

Allow to sit for at least a week before eating, and of course, refrigerate after opening.

 

 

Balsamic Eggplant

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ lbs baby eggplant
1 large red spring onion
3 large cloves garlic
1 cup red wine (preferably Italian)
1 cup water
1 tsp canning salt (or 1 ½ tsp kosher salt)
1 tsp crushed red pepper (optional)
¾ cup balsamic vinegar (5% acidity or higher)

 

PREPARATION

Fill the canning pot with water and bring to a boil. Place 3 pint canning jars and their lids into the pot and sterilize for 10 minutes. While this is happening:
Wash and dry the eggplant, cut off the stem caps, and slice lengthwise into quarters. If using a less-tender-skinned variety of eggplant, you may wish to peel it first. Peel the onion, cut off the ends, cut in half lengthwise and cut into thick slices, also lengthwise. Peel garlic cloves and smash with the broad part of the knife blade.

Put the vegetables into a medium non-reactive pot, add the wine, water, and salt, and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium-high, and allow to cook for 5 minutes.

Add the balsamic vinegar and cook for an additional 5 minutes.

Divide the hot vegetables equally between the 3 hot jars, pressing down firmly. Add the hot liquid to each jar. Release trapped air bubbles with a chopstick or any thin, non-metallic tool (such as a plastic knife), allowing the liquid to fill the space. Leave ½” headroom at the top of each jar, removing any excess liquid with a spoon.

Clean the jar rims well with a wet paper towel, place lids on the jars, screw on the rings finger-tight, and return to the canning pot. Bring back to a rolling boil and process for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow the jars to remain in the water for an additional 5 minutes before removing them to a covered surface to cool. Listen for the ping!

Allow to meld for a minimum 1 ½ – 2 weeks before using. Of course, it gets better with age.

 

 

Baby Carrots in Honey, Vinegar, and Dill

 

INGREDIENTS

1 pound baby carrots
1 cup white wine vinegar
1 cup water
2 tsp. kosher or pickling salt
1/4 tsp. ground white pepper
3 Tbs. honey
4 sprigs fresh young dill (or 2 pinches of dried dill)

 

PREPARATION

Blanch the carrots for 2 minutes in boiling water and drain. Pack the hot carrots into the two hot, sterilized jars.
In a small saucepan, combine the rest of the ingredients, except the dill, and bring just to a boil. Pour the liquid over the carrots, leaving 1/2″ of head space. Add the dill.

Cover with new lids, screw on rings, and process in boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

Wait several minutes after removing the jars from the boiling water, and listen for the reassuring ping! of the lids sealing themselves into place.

Let stand at room temperature for at least two weeks before serving

 

 

Malaysian Cucumber and Carrot Pickles

The recipe is long, but outside of all the chopping it’s pretty easy. A small food processor is very helpful.

 

INGREDIENTS

4 or 5 small Kirby cucumbers (14 ounces total), unpeeled, stemmed, and cut into matchsticks about 2 inches long and 1/4 inch wide
2 medium carrots (about 7 ounces), peeled and cut into matchsticks about 2 inches long and 1/4 inch wide
3 shallots (about 2 1/2 ounces), thinly sliced lengthwise
1 or 2 fresh Holland chiles, or other fresh long, red chiles, such as Fresno or cayenne, stemmed and sliced on the diagonal about 1/4 inch thick
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
For the flavoring paste:
4 shallots (about 3 ounces), coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
3 candlenuts or unsalted macadamia nuts
1 piece fresh ginger, 2 inches long, peeled and thinly sliced against the grain
1 piece turmeric, 2 inches long, peeled and coarsely chopped or 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
2 to 8 small dried red chiles such as arbor, stemmed and coarsely chopped
5 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 teaspoon black mustard seeds
4 tablespoons palm, cider, or rice vinegar
4 tablespoons sugar

 

PREPARATION

Place the cucumbers, carrots, shallots, and chiles into a nonreactive bowl and sprinkle salt over them. Massage the salt into the vegetables, then cover the bowl and set it aside for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring every half hour or so.
Meanwhile, make the flavoring paste. Put the shallots, garlic, candlenuts, ginger, turmeric, and chiles in a small food processor and pulse until they’re the consistency of creamy mashed potatoes. (Alternately, pound in a large mortar and pestle.) If the paste won’t puree properly, you can add up to two tablespoons of water, a teaspoon at a time, and scrape down the sides of the processor.

Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot (but not smoking), add the mustard seeds. As soon as they start to pop, take the pan off the burner and let it cool a bit. You may also want to cover the pan, as the seeds have a tendency to fly off as they pop. Reduce the heat to medium-low, and return the pan to heat. Add the ground paste and sauté — it should sizzle a little, not fry aggressively. Stir to prevent scorching, cooking until the shallots soften and the ginger and garlic become fragrant, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the vinegar and sugar and stir. Raise the heat a bit and bring the liquid to a simmer. Stir constantly until the sugar dissolves and everything is well-combined. Set aside.

Taste the vegetables after they’ve been curing for at least 1 1/2 hours — they should be pleasantly salty with still a bit of crunch. If they’re too salty, immerse them in cold water, massaging to remove brine. (You may need to do this a couple of times.) Either way, drain, pressing gently to remove brine, and pat dry on a kitchen towel.

Add the vegetables to the cooled flavoring paste and stir well.

Transfer the pickle to a serving dish and allow to marinate for at least 30 minutes before serving. Or, store in an airtight jar in the fridge.

 

 

Candied Jalapeños

 

INGREDIENTS

1 pound jalapeño peppers
2/3 cup cider vinegar
2 cups granulated sugar
Juice of 2 limes
1 head of garlic

 

PREPARATION

Sterilize three half pint jars with the lids and bands by boiling in water for 10 minutes. Allow to sit in water while preparing the ingredients.

Slice the jalapeños into ¼-inch thick rounds, and peel the garlic. Set aside. Combine the vinegar, sugar, and lime juice in a saucepan, and heat over medium. Bring the mixture to a boil, and reduce the heat to a simmer for 5 minutes. Add the sliced jalapeños, and bring the mixture back to a boil for another 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Remove jars from water and place on a flat surface. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the jalapeño rings into the jars. Make sure to pack them in because they will continue to reduce in volume. Place 2-3 cloves of garlic in each jar.

Return the syrup to a boil and cook for another five minutes. Remove from heat and ladle over jalapeños in jars, making sure to leave at least ¼” headspace. Wipe the rims, cover with lids, and screw on bands.

Store jars in refrigerator or process in a water bath for 10 minutes and store in a cool, dark place once jars have cooled.

 

 

Daikon and Carrot Pickles (Do Chua)

How to buy daikon radishLook for evenly shaped, firm, smooth, unblemished skin. I gravitate towards daikon radish that are no more than 2 inches in diameter because they tend to have a milder bite and wonderful sweetness. Really young daikon that are less than 1-inch thick are rather tasteless, and older fat daikon radish can be bitter hot. Farmers markets and Asian markets are a great place to score super duper fresh daikon.

How to deal with stinky pickled daikonIf the daikon develops a strong/stinky odor in the jar, it has not gone bad. Before serving, open the jar and let it sit for 15 minutes to allow the smell to dissipate. Leave the room, if you must.

Try this daikon and carrot pickle recipe once and then tweak the recipe to your liking. Variations of the include adding tangy-sweet-pungent pickled shallots (cu kieu) to the mixture, as well as making heavier on the carrot side than the daikon side. Try to keep a higher ratio (say 2:1) of daikon to carrot if you like the mild bite of daikon radish. If you like a tangy-sweet flavor alter the ratio of sugar to vinegar to make the brine sweeter, and hence affect the pickle’s flavor.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 large carrot, peeled and cut into thick matchsticks
1 pound daikons, each no larger than 2 inches in diameter, peeled and cut into thick matchsticks
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons plus 1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups distilled white vinegar
1 cup lukewarm water

 

PREPARATION

Place the carrot and daikons in a bowl and sprinkle with the salt and 2 teaspoons of the sugar. Use your hands to knead the vegetables for about 3 minutes, expelling the water from them. They will soften and liquid will pool at the bottom of the bowl. Stop kneading when you can bend a piece of daikon so that the ends touch but the daikon does not break. The vegetables should have lost about one-fourth of their volume. Drain in a colander and rinse under cold running water, then press gently to expel extra water. Return the vegetables to the bowl if you plan to eat them soon, or transfer them to a 1-quart jar for longer storage.

To make the brine, in a bowl, combine the 1/2 cup sugar, the vinegar, and the water and stir to dissolve the sugar. Pour over the vegetables. The brine should cover the vegetables. Let the vegetables marinate in the brine for at least 1 hour before eating.

They will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks.

 

 

Green Bean Fridge Pickles

Store these tasty green bean fridge pickles, or start snacking after just one day.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ cups water
1 ½ cups white vinegar
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon coriander seed
½ teaspoon black mustard seed
2-inch strip of lemon peel
2 minced garlic cloves
1 large bunch fresh dill
1 quart green beans.

 

PREPARATION

In a saucepan, bring the water, vinegar, salt, coriander seed, black mustard seed, and lemon peel to a boil. Distribute the garlic and dill in sterilized canning jars and fill with green beans.

Pour the boiling brine over the beans, screw the lids on the jars, and cool to room temp.

Refrigerate for at least one day

 

 

Sweet Sour Sandwich Pickle Chips

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ pounds of small pickle cucumbers, about 3 to 5″ long
2 tablespoons pickling spices
1 ½ teaspoons table salt
1 ½ cups distilled white vinegar, 5% acidity
1 ½ cups sugar

 

PREPARATION

Slice the cukes into 1/8″ disks. Place the cucumber slices in a bowl. Sprinkle with the salt, and mix it all together. Put the bowl in the fridge for about 3 hours.

Take an 18 x 18″ square of cheesecloth. Fold in half and again to make a smaller square 4 layers thick. Place the pickling spices in the center of the square. Bring up all the edges and tie them together to make a pouch, and tie it together with some kitchen string.

Put the vinegar and sugar in a saucepan, and add the pouch of pickling spices. Turn the exhaust fan on high or take this outdoors to the sideburner on your grill because the vinegar smell will be strong. Bring to a boil and back it down to a simmer and let the spice bag steep for about 30 minutes.

The salt will pull water from the cukes, so drain them in a colander, rinse off excess salt, shake off excess water, from the rinse and add to a very very clean quart jar. Pour the spiced syrup in while it is still hot, and fill until the pickles are submerged or within 1/4″ of the rim. If there is extra syrup, you can throw it out. If you are short, don’t worry. A few slices may float. That’s OK, too. With a spoon knock out any big bubbles under the pickles. Seal tight, and chill. They can be used the next day but it takes a few days to reach peak flavor. Keep in refrigerator.

 

 

Pickled Peaches

 

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds sugar (about 7 cups)
2 cups white vinegar
2 sticks of cinnamon
2 Tbs whole Cloves
4 quarts ripe peaches

 

PREPARATION

Blanch the peaches in boiling water for about 2 minutes and then plunge them into cold water. The peel will come off very easily.
Boil the sugar, vinegar and spices for 20 minutes. Drop the peeled fruit in one at a time and cook until tender. Pack in hot sterilized jars, adding syrup to ½ inch.

 

Lacto-fermented Zucchini Sticks

Fermented vegetables are not cooked and enzymes are not destroyed. And you will not break a sweat preserving food this way.

 

 

PREPARATION

Cut the squash into sticks or rounds that will easily fit into a wide mouth canning jar leaving about 2″ at the top.

Fill the jar pushing down on the vegetables as necessary. Then make a brine by mixing 3 T sea salt with 4 cups of filtered water. Do not use chlorinated water, which will hinder the fermentation process.

Thoroughly mix the brine and pour over the squash in the canning jar leaving at least an inch at the top. You may want to add a few cloves of garlic, or chunks of onion. A few red pepper flakes are also a nice addition.
To keep the squash crisp, a grape or oak leaf may be added.

Then use a glass canning lid to weigh down the vegetables to be sure they are kept under the brine.
A well scrubbed stone or a small bag filled with brine may also be used.

Cover with and airlock and put in a dark spot (ie. a kitchen cabinet) for 3 – 5 days.
If you don’t have an airlock system you can cover loosely so that gases can escape.

Yes, this process can cause an explosion. After 3 -5 days, then refrigerate.

The fermented vegetables will keep for months in the refrigerator.

 

 

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Lactobacilli

 

The Art of Fermentation dates back thousands of years. Before modern canning techniques were invented, people often relied on lactic acid fermentation to preserve food.
Because the good bacteria, lactobacilli are naturally occurring in cabbage and many other fruits and vegetables, the process is simple. When foods are allowed to ferment under proper conditions, the lactobacilli bacteria convert the food’s natural sugars into lactic acid, giving the final product a pleasant and sour flavor.

Traditional fermentation yields extremely nutritious foods. In contrast, modern pickled foods are essentially dead. No time or organisms are allowed to work on the food to yield beneficial acids, to create more nutrients, or to break down hard-to-digest food substances. When subjected to high-heat canning or pasteurization, vitamins, enzymes, and beneficial organisms are lost. White vinegar, used in modern pickling, is an overly acidic food with no nutritional benefits. By contrast, the acids produced by traditional fermentation are nutritious.

You only want to use canning or pickling salt for fermenting. DO NOT substitute iodized salt, sea salt, kosher salt or other salts.

To prevent contamination from molds, dust, or insects, cover the fermentation container with a clean dishcloth,

You want to occasionally stir the fermenting mixture, this helps distribute the microorganisms and also helps accelerate fermentation.

You want to thoroughly wash all produce. Most microbial pathogens are found on the surface of fruits and vegetables. When applicable, peel and/or trim produce to reduce the risk of surface contamination

Select the proper size containers for fermentation. The general rule is to use a 1-gallon container for each 5 pounds of fresh vegetables. Use ceramic, glass or food grad plastic containers. Non food grade containers may be used if they are lined with a food grad bag. Avoid using metal containers or utensils that may react with acids in the foods.

Wash all containers, utensils, plates, and/or jars that will be used for fermentation in hot, soapy water and rinse well before using.

Select unblemished foods. Bruises and cuts can breach the natural antimicrobial bariers of fruits and vegetables.

Select Firm but ripe fruits and vegetables. Soft or overripe produce may contain undesirable yeasts and/or molds.

Maintain the proper temperature. The ideal fermentation temperature range is 68F to 75F. Fermentation will take place in 3 to 4 weeks. Avoid fermenting at temperatures higher than 75F do to the risk of spoilage.

 

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How to Make Sauerkraut

Using a sharp knife, cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters. Remove and discard the core from each wedge. Finely shred the cabbage.

Combine the cabbage with the pickling salt and sugar, crushing the mixture with your hands to help release the liquid.

Pack the cabbage, along with its liquid into a container and cover with a plate. Press the plate down using a weight, allowing the liquid to rise around the edges of the plate.

 

Pear-Juniper Berry Sauerkraut

 

INGREDIENTS

3 to 4 pounds green or red cabbage
2 Bosc Pears, cored and shredded or finely chopped. (2 cups)
1 ½ Tbs pickling salt
1 Tbs sugar
1 Tbs juniper berries
4 cups water
4 tsp pickling salt

 

PREPARATION

Remove outer leaves from cabbage. Quarter cabbage heads lengthwise; removing cores. Using a mandolin, food processor, or large chef’s knife, finely shred cabbage.
Measure 2 ½ pounds.

Place the shredded cabbage in a large, ceramic crock, glass container or plastic food container that holds at least a gallon.

Add pears, pickling salt, sugar, and berries. Using very clean hands or tongs, toss the cabbage with everything else. Let stand for 10 minutes. Using a clean heavy plate that fits just inside the container, press plate down on cabbage mixture.

Let stand for 2 to 24 hours, tossing cabbage and pressing plate down on cabbage every hour or until enough liquid is released to cover cabbage by at least 1 inch. (if cabbage doesn’t release enough liquid, add brine to cover the same depth. (for brine see ratio above, or combine 1 cup of water to 1 tsp of pickling salt).

Place a large resealable pastic bag filled with the 4 cups water and the 4 tsp of pickling salt (or a clean 1 gallon jug of water) over the plate to weight it down. Cover container with a clean dishcloth or loose-fitting lid. Place the container in a cool place out of direct sunlight to ferment for 2 to 3 weeks.

Every 2 to 3 days while the sauerkraut is fermenting, replace the dishcloth with a clean one and skim off any white residue that forms on the surface of the cabbage.

Clean and replace the plate.

If any discolored cabbage appears at the top, remove and trash.

If the water level gets too low, add enough additional brine to cover.

The cabbage must be submerged completely to brine safely.

If you see any mold at the surface, trash the whole thing.

It is ready when it has a slightly crunchy texture and pleasantly tangy flavor.

Transfer undrained sauerkraut to canning jars or artight containers, seal and label.

Store in the fridge for up to 2 months.

 

TO MAKE CLASSIC SAUERKRAUT:
Prepare as directed, omit the pears and berries.

 

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Kimchi

 

INGREDIENTS

1 medium head napa cabagge
3 Tbs kosher salt
½ cup coarsely shredded daikon
½ cup coarselt shredded carrot
¼ cup chopped green onion
2 Tbs fish sauce
1 – 2 Tbs Korean chili powder (gochugaru red pepper powder or flakes)
Or
Asian Chili Sauce (Sriracha)
1 Tbs grated fresh ginger
2 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp sugar
4 cups water
4 tsp kosher salt

 

PREPARATION

Remove outer leaves from cabbage. Core and chop cabbage into 2-inch pieces. (12 cups). Toss cabbage with the 3 Tbs kosher salt; place in a large colander set over a bowl. Let stand for 2 to 3 hours or until wilted.

In a large, clean bowl, combine daikon, carrot, green onions, fish sauce, Korean chile power, ginger, and sugar. Rinse cabbage and drain well. Ad cabbage to mixure; toss to combine. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Transfer cabbage mixture to a large, ceramic crock, glass container or plastic food container that holds at least a gallon.

Using a clean heavy plate that fits just inside the container, press plate down on cabbage mixture.

Let stand for 2 to 24 hours (5 to 24 hours if doing it in the fridge). tossing cabbage and pressing plate down on cabbage every hour or until enough liquid is released to cover cabbage by at least 1 inch. (if cabbage doesn’t release enough liquid, add brine to cover the same depth. (for brine see ratio above, or combine 1 cup of water to 1 tsp of pickling salt).

Place a large resealable pastic bag filled with the 4 cups water and the 4 tsp of pickling salt (or a clean 1 gallon jug of water) over the plate to weight it down. Cover container with a clean dishcloth or loose-fitting lid. Place the container in a cool place out of direct sunlight

Let stand for 2-3 days. To ferment in the fridge, chill for 3 to 6 days or until the mixture bubbles.

Transfer the Kimchi to canning jars or airtight containers, seal and label.

Store in the fridge for up to 3 weeks before serving.

 

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Pickling vs. Brining vs. Curing

 

There are two other variations on the theme of Pickling: Brining and Curing.
If you like your meat juicy, tender, and flavorful, there is one simple ingredient that can improve all three: Salt. Salt, which is another name for the mineral sodium chloride (NaCl), is probably the oldest way to flavor food and essential to all living things

Salt is a flavor amplifier, it suppresses the impression of bitterness, and it actually expands your taste buds. Many of us sprinkle salt on meat when it is served because it just makes meat taste better. Brining helps bring the benefits of salt to every bite, not just the surface. Although sugar molecules take days to penetrate meat, adding sugar to a wet brine in about the same quantity as the salt, does have some benefits. Sugar sticks to the surface and aids in the browning by speeding up the Maillard reaction, especially at lower temps.

There are several techniques that you can use to bring the benefits of salt to meat: Wet brining, marinating, dry brining, and injecting.

Wet brining works best on salmon, chicken breasts, turkey breasts, and pork loin chops. Chicken thighs, turkey thighs, other cuts of pork, and white flaky fish usually are moist enough from fat that they don’t need wet brines. Keep in mind, wet brines can make poultry skin soggy and harder to crisp.

Most wet brines are 5 to 10% salt by weight. The typical cookbook brine recipe calls for 1 cup of table salt to 1 gallon of water for a 7.7% brine by weight.
The problem is that there are different types of salt: Table salt, kosher salt, pickling salt, sea salt, etc. Some experts recommend you not make a brine from table salt because it has small quantities of other compounds such as iodine mixed in.

But the size and shape of the grains is different for each type which means the air spaces between each grain is different which means that the actual amount of salt by weight can vary drastically from one type to another if you measure by volume. For example, one tablespoon of table salt has almost twice as much NaCl as one tablespoon of kosher salt.

Furthermore, if you mix a cup of water with a cup of table salt, you don’t get two cups because of the air in the salt. You get more like 1.75 cups. If you use Morton’s kosher salt you get more like 1.5 cups because there is more air.

But a pound of any of these salts contains the same amount of NaCl. For that reason, salt is best measured by weight, not volume. When you are making a brine, go by weight and you’ll never go wrong.

In general you want the total wet brine to weigh at least two to three times the weight of the meat so there is enough salt to do the job. This means that if you have 1 pound of meat you should make 2 to 3 pounds of brine. Since meat is mostly water this means that 2 to 3 times the volume will be good. So if you guestimate that you have 1 quart of meat, make 2 to 3 quarts of brine.

 

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BRINE RATIO:

20 PARTS WATER : 1 PART SALT

 

Good Basic Brine

INGREDIENTS
1 Cup Brown Sugar (dark brown sugar works great, too!)
1 Cup Coarse Kosher Salt (Pickling Salt also works)
1 Cup White Sugar
3 Quarts of Water

 

Basic Brine for large items
80 oz water (10 cups)
4 oz kosher salt (about 1/2 cup)

Smoked Salmon Brine
The basic recipe is 4 parts water to 1 part soy sauce with 1/4 cup sea salt for every cup of soy sauce. Figure about 1 cup brine per pound of fish. Add brown sugar, garlic and ginger to taste. White pepper, cayenne pepper, and other seasonings and spices can be added to create unique brines.

 

 

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Dry Brining

 

Dry brining is a technique popularized by the late Chef Judy Rodgers of San Francisco’s famous Zuni Cafe. It is different from wet brining, where we submerge the food in a salt water solution of 5 to 10% salinity. It is different from injecting, where we pump the meat with a brine with a needle.

With dry brining we simply salt the meat a few hours before cooking. No more than you would use at table. Rule of thumb: 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat.

Sounds simple, but something complex and wonderful happens.

Use kosher salt which is a larger flake than table salt and it still dissolves easily on the moist meat. Don’t use large grain salts like sea salt. They won’t dissolve easily. Sprinkle from about 8″ above so it is evenly distributed. Do not over salt, especially on burgers, where too much salt will gel the meat proteins and make for a dense patty. Then back in the fridge. Put it on a wire rack in a pan in the fridge so air will surround the meat. After as little as an hour or two, you’re ready to cook. No need to rinse the meat, all the salt gets sucked in.

 

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Curing

 

Curing is a high concentration brine for meats that usually includes a salt with nitrites. Nitrites are effective in killing the stubborn botulism bacterium. Like pickling, curing often lasts days, even weeks, and can include sugar and spice and everything nice. Curing can be done wet, with the salt dissolved in watere, or dry, just applied to the surface. Because the salt content is so high dry curing can dehydrate the meat. A classic example is bacon or corned beef.

In the days before refrigeration, our ancestors learned that meat would keep longer if smoked or salted. They also discovered that a particular type of salt, sodium nitrite, is an especially good preservative because it inhibits the growth of Clostridium botulinum, a seriously deadly pathogen that creates one of the most lethal toxins known to man, botulinum, the cause of botulism. Sodium nitrite also gives cured meats their characteristic reddish-pink color and adds to their taste and texture.

About 5% of our nitrite intake comes from cured meats such as bacon, hot dogs, hams, pastrami, corned beef, cured sausages, and cured fish. But 95% of the nitrites we consume come from the natural compounds in vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, celery, and carrots, and even some drinking water. They contain nitrates (with an “a”) some of which are converted by our digestive system to nitrites (with an “i”). In the stomach, nitrite can create nitric oxide, a compound that is thought to be important in healing wounds and burns, controlling blood pressure, and boosting immunity.

There are two methods of curing, dry or wet. To dry cure, you mix up your salt and spice mix and coat the meat and hang it in a temperature and humidity controlled space. If you don’t do everything right, the meat will spoil. Wet curing is more even, thorough, reliable, and easy. You get the right distribution of salt all over with no “hot spots”.
Remember, curing is different than brining. The salt concentrations are higher when you cure, you are using a special curing salt, and the meat is in the cure longer. So even though some may prefer dry brining for something like a steak or chicken, for a ham or bacon or corned beef, wet curing is the way to go.

 

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Sauces and Dressings

 

Barbecue sauces, cooking sauces and marinades offer culinary arts in a bottle, and appear to have a bright future. Sauces provide a convenient way for restaurants and home cooks to add a variety of texture and flavor to meals.

This is why the FANFOOD Sauces Section of our Recipes Page is so extensive.

If you haven’t heard of Sriracha Sauce, you must be living under a rock, It’s the ketchup of the new century. It’s great on everything from eggs to pizza.

Here is a homemade version for you to try at home:

 

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Homemade Sriracha (Asian Chili Sauce)

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ pounds fresh ot red chili peppers, such as Fresno, Anaheim, Thai, Jalapeno, and/or serrano, stemmed and coarsely chopped
¼ cup packed brown sugar
¼ cup water
1 Tbs kosher salt
5 cloves garlic, smashed
½ cup rice vinegar
1 tsp fish sauce (optional)

 

PREPARATION

In a food processer or blender combine peppers, sugar, water, salt and garlic. Cover and process or blend for 3 minutes.
Transfer mixture to a 2 quart food safe ceramic, glass, or plastic bowl or container.

Cover loosely with plastic wrap.

Place in a dark, dry place at room temperature and let stand for 8 days to ferment, stirring once every day.

After 2 to 3 days you should notice bubbling in the mixture, showing that fermentation is occurring.

Return mixture to food processor or blender. Add rice vinegar, cover and process until smooth. Strain mixture through a fine mesh sieve into a large saucepan, discard solids.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 5 minutes or until slightly thickened, stirring frequently. Remove from heat. If desired, stir in fish sauce. Cool to room temperature.

Transfer chili sauce to canning jars or airtight containers. Seal and store in the fridge for up to 6 months

 

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More FANFOOD Sauces

 

A1 BBQ sauce
Antipasto Sauce/Dressing
Apple City Barbecue Sauce
Apple Mustard Grilling Sauce
Asian Paste
Avery Island BBQ Sauce
Bacon and Brown Butter Viniagrette
Bacon Jam
Baconnaise
Balsamic Glaze
Basil and Garlic Mayonnaise
Basil Mayonnaise
BBQ Chicken Glaze
BBQ Sauce Vinaigrette
Beer-Spring Onion Mustard
Best “Kansas City” BBQ Sauce
Black Jack Barbecue Sauce
Black Pepper Vinegar Sauce
Bone Suckin’ Sauce Clone
Bourbon Pecan Sauce
Bourbon Sauce #2
Brown Sugar Bourbon Butter
Brown Sugar Mustard Ham Glaze
Burger Special Sauce
Burger Special Sauce#2
Carolina Mustard Sauce
Chick-fil-A Sauce
Chile and Beer Barbecue Sauce
Chile Lime Vinaigrette
Chipotle Barbecue Sauce
Chutney Mayonnaise
Coffee and Smoke BBQ Sauce
Cucumber-Dill Sauce
Diablo Steak Sauce
Dijon Mayo
Eastern Carolina BBQ Sauce
Easy “Carolina-style” BBQ Sauce
Easy Turkey Gravy
Garlic Mustard Glaze
Ginger-Sesame Mayonnaise
Homemade Mayo in 2 minutes or less
Homemade Mayonnaise
Homemade Steak Sauce
Honey Mustard Mayo
Horseradish Mayonnaise
Iced Tea Barbecue Sauce
Jamaican BBQ Sauce
Kickin’ BBQ Orange-Spice Wing Sauce
Lemon Mayonnaise
Lemon-Herb Mayonnaise
Lexington Dip
Memphis BBQ Sauce
Mustard Cream Sauce
Naughty Syrup
Orange and Ginger Mayonnaise
Peanut Sauce
Pesto Mayonnaise
Pickled Jalapeno Mayonnaise
Piment D’Espelette Mayonnaise
Plum Sauce
Raspberry BBQ Sauce
Red Pepper Mayonnaise
Redeye Mayonnaise
Roasted Red Pepper Mayonnaise
Salsa Verde 1
Salsa Verde 2
Sherry Vinaigrette
Short Rib Glaze
Southern Style Vinegar BBQ Sauce
Spicy Chipotle Chili Mayonnaise
Spicy Root Beer Barbecue Sauce
St. Louis Barbecue Sauce #1
Sun-Dried Tomato Mayonnaise
Sweet Bourbon-Coffee Sauce
Tarragon-Caper Mayonnaise
Tarragon-Malt Vinegar Mayonnaise
Tennessee Whiskey Barbecue Sauce
Texas BBQ Sauce
Tomatillo Cilantro Cream Sauce
Tzatziki Sauce
Wasabi Mayonnaise
Whiskey Cream Sauce
Whiskey Grill Glaze
Whiskey-Ginger Marinade
White BBQ Sauce #2
Worcestershire Pub Mustard
Yogurt Sauce

 

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Dressing 101

 

Salad dressings have a long and colorful history, dating back to ancient times. The Babylonians used oil and vinegar for dressing greens nearly 2,000 years ago. Egyptians favored a salad dressed with oil, vinegar and Asian spices. Mayonnaise is said to have made its debut at a French Nobleman’s table over 200 years ago.

Prepared dressings were largely unavailable until the turn of the century. Until then, home chefs had to start from scratch. Due to variations in ingredients, partly because of lacking storage conditions and year-round supply sources), results varied significantly. Gradually, restaurants began packaging and selling their consistent dressings product to customers, and the salad dressing industry began.

Many of the major brands of salad dressings available today were on the market as early as the 1920’s.
In 1896, Joe Marzetti opened a restaurant in Columbus, OH and began to serve his customers a variety of dressings developed from old country recipes. He began packaging his dressings to sell to restaurant customers in 1919.

In 1912 Richard Hellmann, a deli owner in New York, began to sell his blue ribbon mayonnaise in wooden containers. One year later, in response to a very strong consumer demand, Mr. Hellmann began to market the mayonnaise in glass jars.

In 1925, the Kraft Cheese Company entered the salad products business with the purchase of several regional mayonnaise manufacturers and the Milani Company (which led to Kraft’s initial entry into the pourable dressing business with French Dressing as its first flavor).

 

What’s In a Name?

 

Coleslaw: Dutch word for cabbage is “kool” which led to the English word for a cabbage-based salad.

Caesar Salad: Honors restaurateur Caesar Cardini, who invented it in Tijuana, Mexico in 1924. Cardini’s original recipe included romaine, garlic, croutons, Parmesan cheese, boiled eggs, olive oil and Worcestershire sauce. He was said to be staunchly against the inclusion of anchovies in this mixture, contending that the Worcestershire sauce was what actually provided that faint fishy flavor.

Cobb Salad: Was the invention of yet another restaurateur, Bob Cobb, who in 1926 at his Los Angeles restaurant, now known as The Brown Derby, found a way to use up leftovers. The original recipe for Cobb salad: avocado, celery, tomato, chives, watercress, hard-boiled eggs, chicken, bacon and Roquefort cheese.

Horseradish: (Prepared) Horseradish has nothing to do with horses and it is not a radish (it’s a member of the mustard family). The name may have come from an English adaptation of its German name. In early times the plant grew wild in European coastal areas; the Germans called it meerrettich, or sea radish. The German word meer sounds like mare in English. Perhaps mareradish eventually became horseradish. The word horseradish first appeared in print in 1597 in John Gerarde’s English herbal on medicinal plants.

Mayonnaise: Many authorities believe the first batch of this mixture of egg yolks, oil and seasonings was whipped up to celebrate the 1756 French capture of Mahon (accent on the “o”), a city on the Spanish Isle of Minorca, by forces under Louis-Francois-Armad de Vignerot du Plessis, duc de Richelieu. Besides enjoying a reputation as a skillful military leader, the Duke was also widely known as a bon vivant with the odd habit of inviting his guests to dine in the nude. The Duke, or more likely, his personal chef, is credited with inventing this edible monument to that strategic success.

Green Goddess Dressing: A mixture of mayonnaise, anchovies, tarragon vinegar, parsley, scallions, garlic, and other spices was created at San Francisco’s Palace Hotel in the 1920’s for actor George Arliss, who stayed there while performing in The Green Goddess, a play that later became one of the earliest “talkie” movies.

Russian Dressing: Got its name because the earliest versions of the mixture of mayonnaise, pimientos, chives, ketchup, and spices included a distinctly Russian ingredient: caviar.

Thousand Island: Made from bits of green olives, peppers, pickles, onions, hard-boiled eggs and other finely chopped ingredients, this chunky dressing is said to commemorate the Thousand Islands in the Saint Lawrence River.

 

 

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Making Homemade Mayo

[ in 2 minutes or less ]

 

There are a number of techniques for making homemade mayo, with the blender or the food processor being the usual go-to’s—their high-speed whirring blades make short work of dispersing oil droplets. The problem with either of these appliances, however, is that you need to make a fairly large volume of mayo for them to work—start with a single egg yolk, for example, and there’s not enough volume in there to spin around properly. The egg flies up and splats against the walls, leaving you nothing to work with at the bottom of the jar/bowl. They also still require you to drizzle in your oil ever-so-slowly.

The easy solution? Use a hand blender. With a hand blender you can add all of your ingredients—oil included—directly to the blending cup. Because it is less dense than the other ingredients, the oil will float at the top. When you subsequently stick the blades of the hand blender down into the cup, they’ll be in direct contact with the egg yolk, water, acid, and mustard. Turn that blender on, and it creates a vortex, gradually pulling the oil down into the whirling blades.

 

 

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FANFOOD Dressings

 

You might be thinking, “Why Salad Dressing Recipes?” Try not to think too hard about it, but think about it this way. The combination of the ingredients below along with the combination of some of them from the marinades section of our recipe page, may inspire you to create different flavors for pickling.  The truth is, this article began with finding these dressings and morphed into “pickle this!”

 

 

 

Lemon-Anchovy Vinaigrette

A lighter, brighter option for all you Caesar salad lovers.

 

INGREDIENTS

2 lemons
4 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained, finely chopped
½ cup olive oil
¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Cut all peel and white pith from lemons; discard. Working over a medium bowl, cut lemons along sides of membranes to release segments into bowl. Squeeze in juice from membranes and discard membranes.

Mix in anchovies, oil, and red pepper flakes, breaking up lemon segments against the side of the bowl with a spoon; season with salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 4 days ahead. Transfer to a jar; cover and chill.
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Herby Lime Dressing

A blend of chiles, arugula, mint, and lime, this dressing brightens up everything from salads and grains to fish and meat

 

INGREDIENTS

1 chopped serrano chile or jalapeño (seeds removed; optional)
½ cup (packed) arugula
½ cup (packed) fresh mint leaves
½ cup vegetable oil
¼ cup olive oil
½ teaspoon finely grated lime zest
¼ cup fresh lime juice
½ teaspoon sugar
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Purée chile, arugula, mint, vegetable oil, olive oil, lime zest, lime juice, and sugar in a blender until smooth; season with salt and pepper.
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Creamy Lemon–Mustard Vinaigrette

This lemony dressing is the classic vinaigrette, and too easy not to make.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 small shallot, chopped
¾ cup olive oil
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Purée shallot, oil, lemon juice, mustard, and honey in a blender until smooth; season with salt and a generous amount of pepper.

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Peanut Dressing

A Thai restaurant classic, this peanut dressing makes an equally great dipping sauce for dumplings and summer rolls.

 

INGREDIENTS

½ cup smooth peanut butter
2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Whisk peanut butter, rice vinegar, sugar, and soy sauce in a medium bowl until smooth. Whisk in water until dressing is the consistency of heavy cream (¼–½ cup); season with salt and pepper.

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Creamy Herb Dressing

 

INGREDIENTS

1 large egg yolk
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
2 tablespoons Sherry vinegar
½ cup olive oil
½ cup (packed) fresh dill leaves
½ cup (packed) fennel fronds
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

 

PREPARATION

Pulse egg yolk, garlic, and vinegar in a food processor until smooth. With motor running, gradually drizzle in oil and process until emulsified. Add dill and fennel and process, adding water by the tablespoonful as needed, until dressing is the consistency of heavy cream; season with salt and pepper.
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Sesame-Miso Vinaigrette

If the vibrancy of this dressing fades, perk it back up with more lime juice.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 red Fresno chile, with seeds, finely chopped
¼ cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons white miso
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
½ teaspoon grated peeled ginger

 

PREPARATION

Whisk all ingredients in a small bowl.
DO AHEAD: Vinaigrette can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.

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Charred Corn Husk Oil Dressing

Corn husks can be transformed into a surprisingly flavorful oil. This vinaigrette is best tossed with Bibb lettuce, radishes, and crisp pumpernickel croutons.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 cup vegetable oil
5 oz. firm tofu, drained, cut into pieces
3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. honey
1 ear of corn, in husk
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Preheat broiler. Shuck corn, reserving husk; discard silk and set aside corn for another use. Place pieces of husk in a single layer on a broilerproof baking sheet. Broil until charred and blackened in spots, about 4 minutes. Let cool slightly.

Purée charred husk and oil in a blender until husk is the size of confetti and oil is darkened in color. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl (you should have about 1 cup infused oil).

Purée tofu, lemon juice, vinegar, honey, and ¼ cup corn husk oil in a blender until smooth; season with salt and pepper (reserve remaining oil for another use).

DO AHEAD: Charred corn husk oil can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.
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Cherry Tomato Vinaigrette

 

INGREDIENTS

1 pint cherry tomatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 tablespoon (or more) red wine vinegar
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

 

PREPARATION

Cut half of cherry tomatoes in half. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring often, until softened, about 4 minutes.

Add halved and whole tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until beginning to release juices, 4–6 minutes. Mash some of tomatoes with a spoon.

Add 1 tablespoon vinegar and remaining 2 tablespoons oil; season with salt and pepper. Serve warm or room temperature; add chives just before serving.

DO AHEAD: Vinaigrette can be made (without chives) 2 days ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature and stir in chives.
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Shallot Vinaigrette

 

PREPARATION

Combine 1 finely chopped shallot, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, and 1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar in a jar; season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Let sit 20 minutes. Add 1/3 cup olive oil and cover. Shake to combine.
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Canal House Green Goddess Dressing

This dressing is equally good drizzled over hard-boiled eggs or with crudité for dipping.

 

INGREDIENTS

½ bunch watercress, tough stems removed, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
4 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained
½ cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons sour cream
½ cup (lightly packed) fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

PREPARATION

Purée watercress, anchovies, mayonnaise, sour cream, parsley, chives, tarragon, and vinegar in a blender until smooth; season with salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 2 days ahead. Transfer to a jar; cover and chill.
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Simplest Asian Dressing

The delicate flavor of rice vinegar along with the other Asian ingredients in this vinaigrette is ideal on tender greens like mizuna or mâche.

 

INGREDIENTS

½ small garlic clove, finely grated
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoons unseasoned rice vinegar
½ cup olive oil
½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Whisk garlic, soy sauce, and vinegar in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil, then sesame oil (dressing will thicken slightly); season with salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 2 days ahead. Transfer to a jar; cover and chill.

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Herb Dressing

 

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves
1/2 cup packed) fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

 

PREPARATION

Pulse basil, parsley, zest, and pepper flakes, if using, in a food processor until coarsely chopped. Add oil and lemon juice and pulse to combine; season with salt and pepper.
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Fresh Chive Vinaigrette

 

INGREDIENTS

1/2 small garlic clove, finely chopped
Kosher salt
2 teaspoons white wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
Freshly ground black pepper
8 cups salad greens and fresh herb leaves and tender stems

 

PREPARATION

Combine garlic and a pinch of salt in a large salad bowl. Mash to a paste with a fork. Mix in vinegar, then oil and chives; season with salt and pepper. Add greens and herbs and toss to coat.
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Citrus Vinaigrette

Always make more salad dressing than you’ll need. It takes no longer to mix a big batch, and it means tomorrow night’s salad will be ready in minutes. This recipe makes enough vinaigrette for three large salads.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 small shallot, finely chopped
¾ cup olive oil
¼ cup Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
¼ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

Combine first 6 ingredients in a small jar; season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper. Shake to blend.

DO AHEAD: Vinaigrette can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill. Shake before using.

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Granny Smith Apple Cider Vinaigrette

 

PREPARATION

Purée 1 chopped Granny Smith apple (with core and peel), 1/4 cup raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar, and 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice in a blender, occasionally scraping down sides of blender with a spatula, until smooth. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl, pressing down on solids with spatula to extract all juice; discard solids. Whisk in 1 tablespoon minced shallot and 1 teaspoon raw sugar. Whisk in 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon safflower or grapeseed oil until well blended. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

DO AHEAD Vinaigrette can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Re whisk before using.
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Buttermilk Green Goddess Dressing

 

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup chopped fresh chives
1/4 cup coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 anchovy fillets packed in oil (drained, chopped)
1 chopped garlic clove
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

PREPARATION

In a processor, purée the first 8 ingredients until smooth. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

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Garlic, Oregano, and Lemon Vinaigrette

 

INGREDIENTS

2 garlic cloves
2 anchovy fillets packed in oil (drained)
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
Pinch of kosher salt plus more
1/2 lemon, seeded and finely chopped (with peel)
1/4 cup (loosely packed) fresh oregano leaves
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Fresh lemon juice

 

PREPARATION

Finely chop garlic, anchovy fillets, red pepper flakes, and salt in a mini-processor. Add lemon and oregano; pulse a few times to coarsely chop. Add oil; process until a coarse purée forms. Season with more salt and fresh lemon juice, if desired.

DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.
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Miso, Carrot, and Sesame Dressing

 

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup white miso
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/4 cup (packed) finely grated peeled carrot
2 tablespoons finely grated peeled ginger
2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
4 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
2 teaspoons honey

 

PREPARATION

Place all ingredients plus 1/4 cup water in a resealable container. Cover and shake vigorously until well combined.

DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.
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Creamy Dijon Vinaigrette

When we make vinaigrette, we always reach for Dijon. It’s got the perfect balance of zip and bite and helps emulsify the dressing.

 

PREPARATION

Pulse 1/4 cup good-quality red or white wine vinegar, 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard, 1 Tbsp. honey, 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, and 1/2 garlic clove in a blender to combine. With motor running, slowly add 1/2 cup vegetable oil, then 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
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Tofu-Peppercorn Ranch Dressing

 

 

INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup Vegenaise
1/2 cup plain unsweetened soy yogurt
4 ounces soft (silken) tofu (about 1/2 cup)
1/4 cup unsweetened rice milk
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh dill
1 1/2 teaspoons white miso (fermented soybean paste)
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 teaspoon ume plum vinegar (optional)
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh tarragon
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
Pinch of mustard powder
Kosher salt

 

PREPARATION

Purée all ingredients except salt in a blender until smooth. Season to taste with salt.

DO AHEAD: Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.
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Anchovy & Roasted Garlic Vinaigrette

 

INGREDIENTS

1 head garlic
4 anchovies, chopped
2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
2 tablespoons Sherry vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup vegetable oil
Salt and pepper
Cucumbers, peeled, seeded and sliced
Tomatoes, sliced

 

PREPARATION

Halve head of garlic crosswise and wrap in foil, cut side up. Roast in a 450° oven until tender, about 45 minutes. Let cool, then squeeze cloves into a medium bowl. Add anchovies; mash with a fork into paste.

Whisk in chopped parsley, Sherry vinegar, fresh lemon juice, Dijon mustard, sugar, and crushed red pepper flakes, then extra-virgin olive oil and vegetable oil. Whisk until combined. Season with salt and pepper. Serve over tomato slices or peeled, seeded cucumber slices.
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FANFOOD Pickling Tips

 

 

  • If pickling cucumbers are not available use regular garden cucumbers. DO NOT USE Waxed Cucumbers sold in supermarkets.
  • Use the right variety. Cucumbers that are best for pickling include Kirby, Persian, and Hot house varieties.
  • Select the best small, firm cucumbers with brightly colored skin and rounded edges.
  • Avoid cukes with shriveled or soft spots, or ones appear bloated or with white or yellow areas on the skin.
  • Trim the edges removing the stem and blossom ends before pickling – they contain enzymes that can cause your cucumbers to become mushy.
  • Use a mandolin to create perfectly uniform slices.
  • You want to thoroughly wash all produce. Most microbial pathogens are found on the surface of fruits and vegetables. When applicable, peel and/or trim produce to reduce the risk of surface contamination
  • Wear food safe gloves when handling hot peppers, if you wear contacts and don’t, you are going to feel the effect of being pepper sprayed.
  • Wash all containers, utensils, plates, and/or jars that will be used for fermentation in hot, soapy water and rinse well before using.
  • Select unblemished foods. Bruises and cuts can breach the natural antimicrobial bariers of fruits and vegetables.
  • You only want to use canning or pickling salt for fermenting. DO NOT substitute iodized salt, sea salt, kosher salt or other salts.
  • To prevent contamination from molds, dust, or insects, cover the fermentation container with a clean dishcloth,
  • You want to occasionally stir the fermenting mixture, this helps distribute the microorganisms and also helps accelerate fermentation.
  • You want to thoroughly wash all produce. Most microbial pathogens are found on the surface of fruits and vegetables. When applicable, peel and/or trim produce to reduce the risk of surface contamination
  • Maintain the proper temperature. The ideal fermentation temperature range is 68F to 75F. Fermentation will take place in 3 to 4 weeks. Avoid fermenting at temperatures higher than 75F do to the risk of spoilage.
  • Select the proper size containers for fermentation. The general rule is to use a 1-gallon container for each 5 pounds of fresh vegetables. Use ceramic, glass or food grad plastic containers. Non food grade containers may be used if they are lined with a food grad bag. Avoid using metal containers or utensils that may react with acids in the foods.
  • Wash all containers, utensils, plates, and/or jars that will be used for fermentation in hot, soapy water and rinse well before using.
  • Select unblemished foods. Bruises and cuts can breach the natural antimicrobial bariers of fruits and vegetables.
  • Select Firm but ripe fruits and vegetables. Soft or overripe produce may contain undesirable yeasts and/or molds.
  • Most wet brines are 5 to 10% salt by weight. The typical cookbook brine recipe calls for 1 cup of table salt to 1 gallon of water for a 7.7% brine by weight.
  • When you are making a brine, go by weight and you’ll never go wrong.
  • In general you want the total wet brine to weigh at least two to three times the weight of the meat so there is enough salt to do the job. This means that if you have 1 pound of meat you should make 2 to 3 pounds of brine. Since meat is mostly water this means that 2 to 3 times the volume will be good. So if you guestimate that you have 1 quart of meat, make 2 to 3 quarts of brine.
  • BRINE RATIO: 20 PARTS WATER : 1 PART SALT
  • With dry brining simply salt the meat a few hours before cooking. No more than you would use at table. Rule of thumb: 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat.

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Links

 

FANFOOD Rules

 

 

1. Don’t Be A Quitter
2. Never Use Lighter Fluid
3. Check the Weather
4. Use A Digital Thermometer
5. Pickle This!
6. Never use Plain Mayo Again
7. Make Your Moves
8. Know The Difference between Bourbon, Scotch & Whiskey
9. Know the Closers in Waiting
11. Know Your Prospects
12. Never Put a Cold Steak on a Hot Grill
13. Have a Plan for used Charcoal
14. Learn The Reverse Sear Technique
15. Make Trades to Improve Your Team
17. Never Give Up On A Player
19. Stay ahead of the MLB Trading Deadline

 

Completely Pickled.com

Amazing Ribs – Zen of Pickles

The Pickle Guys – NYC

The Mad Fermantationist

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods

Complete Guide to Home Canning and Preserving 

We Sure Can!: How Jams and Pickles Are Reviving the Lure and Lore of Local Food

Flamingo Musings

Learning and Yearning

Better Homes and Gardens Home Canning and Freezing

 

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